Monday, 12 September 2011

Building an Islamic State in Central Asia


Kyrgyzstan ... Radical Extremist organizations continue to strengthen their activity

12/09-2011 
“In Kyrgyzstan radical extremist organizations continue to strengthen their activity,” the first deputy chairman of the State National Security Committee Kolbay Musayev said today at the sitting of the Council for Ensuring Security and Order under the Government.
According to him, on the territory of the republic there are about 200 extremist websites, the majority of which is controlled from abroad. “The members of the Tabligi Zhamaat Religious Organization became more active. It is formally subordinate to the regulations of the Religious Department of Muslims of Kyrgyzstan. In fact the general purpose of this organization is building of an Islamic state in Kyrgyzstan and Central Asia. The founders of the company are in Pakistan. Every day a number of its members grows. To the moment it has reached 18 thousand people, not including the activists and leaders,” said Коlbay Musayev.
As the official noted, the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community acts on the territory of the Kyrgyz Republic. “Officially its activities are aimed at the construction of social projects, reconstruction of objects of cult. In a number of countries this organization is prohibited as destructive. Its activity leads to a split among the true believers and the radicalization of society, and as a result canonical Islam can be replaced by extremism and terrorism. I should admit that the Religious Department of Muslims of Kyrgyzstan does not work properly in this direction,” said Коlbay Musayev.
The deputy head of the State National Security Committee told that the Hizb ut-Tahrir and the Al-Qaeda members are still active.
URL: http://eng.24.kg/community/2011/09/12/20252.html
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